Artists Libby Black and Serena Cole will walk us through their adjacent solo exhibitions followed by some informal Q&A

On Tuesday June 14th Libby Black and Serena Cole will host a walk through and discussion about their current solo shows, A Light That Never Goes Out by Libby Black and Let Me Look At You by Serena Cole on view until June 30. This event is free but RSVP is mandatory as seating is limited. Gallery 16 is joining with Painting Salon to present this intimate opportunity to discuss the artwork with the artists themselves.

Eventbrite RSVP here

Date Tuesday June 14, 7pm - 9pm

Location  Gallery 16, 501 3rd St, SF, 94107

Program

7:00pm - Doors Open

7:30pm  - Gallery Walk Through

8:00pm  - Discussion / Q&A

This talk is presented in tandem with The Painting Salon's June lecture. The Painting Salon is a monthly lecture series aimed at fostering a dialogue about contemporary painting in the Bay Area.  

 

Tucker Nichols talk at SFMOMA Thursday 6/9 at 6pm

Gallery Artist Tucker Nichols Talk at SFMOMA Thursday 6/9 at SFMOMA

Tucker will be talking about things that inspire his practice along with Jay Dion of Atelier Dion. This talk is the final lecture in the series titled Assignment #4 Start a Lecture Series which is presented by Will Rogan and John Herschend, editiors of The Thing. The series is in tandem with the exhibition Learning to Love You More. The lecture will take place at Koret Education Center at 6pm Thursday 6.9.2016 at the SFMOMA.

 

 

 

Lectures on Things by People, SFMOMA Thursday 6/2 at 6pm

Gallery Artist Alice Shaw in conversation with Tammy Rae Carland at SFMOMA:
Lectures on Things by People
Alice Shaw & Tammy Rae Carland

The 4th lecture in THE THING Quarterly's series Lectures on Things by People features artists Alice Shaw and Tammy Rae Carland.  The series is presented as part of the SFMOMA exhibitionLearning to Love You More, curated by THE THING Quarterly editors Will Rogan and Jonn Herschend.  

Previous lecture participants include: Miranda July, Harrell Fletcher, Mike Wilkins, Thao Nguyen, Yves Béhar, and Jim Christensen.  The final lecture will take place June 9thwith Jay Dion (of Atelier Dion) and Tucker Nichols.

TWO WAYS TO GET YOUR TICKETS FOR THIS THURSDAY

  • 30 free tickets available. (Does not include admission to the rest of the museum)
  • Museum tickets include admission to the lecture.

G16 seeking new Gallery and Print Shop Manager

Gallery and Print Shop Manager – Full time position available

Gallery 16, a contemporary fine art gallery and Urban Digital Color, a fine art printmaking studio, were established in 1993. Gallery 16 has presented over 200 exhibitions with some of the world's foremost contemporary artists. UDC was among the first printmaking facilities in the world to produce artists editions with digital printmaking technology.

The Gallery Manager is responsible for working directly with exhibiting & collaborating artists, clients and engaging with the public while managing all aspects of day to day operations of both Gallery 16 and Urban Digital Color. The Gallery Manager reports directly to the gallery’s Founder/Owner, Griff Williams. Gallery 16 also functions as a venue for occasional events. The manager will in addition be responsible for coordinating and managing event rentals as needed.

This is full time position, Monday – Friday, 9­ to 5pm with flexibility during installation/deinstallation weeks and certain evenings.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

GALLERY 16

The following reflects the gallery’s definition of primary responsibilities for this position but does not restrict the tasks that may be assigned. The Founder/Owner may assign or reassign duties and responsibilities to this position at any time.

ARTIST MANAGEMENT
• Serve as the main point of contact for artists within the gallery; build and maintain artist relationships
• Cultivate sales opportunities, particularly with museums, collectors, art consultants, etc.
• Coordinate shipping, packing and installation of works with artists
• Manage exhibition programming as needed, including writing/editing press release information, reaching out to press regarding upcoming exhibitions and artists’ news/projects

GALLERY OPERATIONS
• Manage the installation and de­installation of exhibitions
• Manage all gallery communications
• Manage all sales records and accounting (accounts receivable; accounts payable; quotes, invoices and receipts); adjust databases – both publicly and internally - to reflect changes in inventory
• Maintain the gallery's online presence including website, social media, and email
marketing and online marketplaces (i.e. Artsy, 1stDibs)
• Manage and track all gallery inventory
• Manage all supporting staff; delegate work to gallery assistant
• Maintain all gallery "back of house" areas – including cleaning, organizing, restocking as needed
• Regularly responsible for creation of all official documents regarding loans, consignments, proposals, sales, quotes, etc.
• Assisting the gallery owner
­• Engage with the public in touring them through exhibitions, answering questions and engaging with visitors in an eloquent, welcoming and well ­articulated manner

URBAN DIGITAL COLOR

PRINTSHOP MANAGEMENT
• Prepare all paperwork for incoming projects and printing/scanning requests & relay all information to master printers
• Receive inquiries and direct to master printers when needed
• Consult and provide pricing, options and estimated production time to potential clients
• Manage all invoices/accounts receivable
• Ensure the timely and neat packaging/shipment of outgoing orders
• Order printing supplies and materials as needed

EVENT RENTALS

• Receive & respond to inquiries by phone and email
• Coordinate & handle site visits with potential clients
• Manage all rental bookings, contracts & invoices
• Provide instruction for all vendors & clients as needed before and during the event
• Manage the events calendar

QUALIFICATIONS

• Must be organized and self­-directed
• Strong attention to detail
• Excellent written and verbal communication skills
• Professional and poised phone manner
• Strong interpersonal skills
• Demonstrated sales ability
• Must be able to multitask in a fast paced environment
• Feels comfortable dealing with clients, artists and the public
• Knowledge of contemporary and 20th Century art, specifically Bay Area artists, organizations
• Proficient use of MS Office Suite, Thunderbird/Gmail, Adobe Photoshop & InDesign, Mail Chimp, Account Edge Pro, Filemaker Pro and basic website maintenance

Bachelor's degree required. Minimum 1 to 2 years gallery or museum experience in comparable role, with emphasis placed on demonstrated qualities. A current knowledge of contemporary visual arts and art history is also necessary.

Please send cover letter and resume to Griff@gallery16.com

 

 

Michelle Grabner's "Gingham" at Rocket Gallery, Art Forum Critic's pick

Michelle Grabner
ROCKET GALLERY
4-6 Sheep Lane
October 14, 2015–January 16, 2016

Michelle Grabner, Untitled [cadmium red deep/green], 2015, oil, gesso, burlap, 24 x 48".

For over twenty years, Michelle Grabner has taken the vernacular patterns of domesticity as a departure point for the creation of abstract paintings. For “Gingham,” her latest exhibition, the artist transmogrifies this common, happy-looking, and picnic-ready fabric into thickly painted works on rough burlap.

From a distance, Untitled [cadmium red deep/green], 2015, looks like a crisscross of red stripes on a white ground. Up close, it reveals itself actually to be made up of pink, red, and white squares over a green ground, the red and pink squares butting against each other in synchronous harmony. The green ground seeping out from beneath each square creates moments of chromatic vibration, loosening the representation of “gingham” into an odd geometric abstraction, a relative of psychedelic Op.

In the project space, Grabner has partially reconstructed her first show at the gallery, “Home Painting,” from 1998. In this installation, seven enamel-on-panel paintings are hung alongside a monitor playing an episode of Martha Stewart’s 1990s television show. “Home Painting” is a marvelous opportunity to see the artist’s graphic, painterly evolution. Her “Gingham” works are fat, voluptuous—rather in stark contrast to the lighter and more fluid stenciling of the older paintings. Grabner’s current pieces, as is made clear through the parallel shows, have become slower to the gaze, transcending the prosaic Martha Stewart domesticity of her inspiration.

— Sherman Sam

an essay on Charles Linder's "Pinnochio" - via The Modern Review

Pinnochio

by Daniel Kine

published via The Modern Review

Pinocchio,+Charles+Linder+(2015)

In an interview with the Smithsonian’s Archive of American Art, Paul Karlstorm described Charles Linder’s Refusalon, an unstructured multimedia and lifestyle exhibition centered in San Francisco SOMA District in the mid 1990’s, as “A conceptual piece investigating the often conflicting worlds of creative idealism and business realities.” More than a decade later, Linder’s application, much like the city where he resides (San Francisco), seems motivated by a similar subject: divergence.

At the center of Linder’s fourth solo exhibition, Fencing Luminaries, which recently ran at San Francisco’s Gallery 16, was the sculptural work, Pinocchio. A dexterously hand carved frame, fixing a mirror, from the center of which protrudes a common household plunger. Simple and, bearing its title in mind, deceivingly unadorned in metaphor. And yet the state of modern art and the city of San Francisco loom heavy here, both in visceral extremes. The childish fairytale, the interlaced skill and elegance of tradition in handcrafted ornamentation, and the prop—the emblem of an idea at once sustainable, consumable, and dismissible.           

Samuel Beckett wrote of mundane, detailed scenarios. Nothing vivid, no action. The plot consisted of the lives that these common characters had or had not led before entering into the lights of the stage. Often Beckett’s audiences cited, if not boredom, confusion. They could get this at home, these muddled dialogues and subjective non-illuminations. No one was attending the theatre with the intention of seeing themselves, rather their presence as spectators was predicated on the belief that, in order to escape, one must present themselves with a perceived potential. A possibility. Something new.

For the majority of those attending galleries and exhibitions of contemporary art, daily American life consists chiefly of a specifically mundane separation—the narrative of the self separated from the idea of the displayed work or their own romanticized notion of the life of the artist, and the separation of oneself from their surroundings. When asked by a critic why he made such boring films, Godard once said that he did so because people lead boring lives. They work selling products, like hamburgers, which they themselves do not believe in or care about, and then they leave work and come to the cinema to relax, to get away from reality and to see themselves or what they could, in some alternate reality, one day be. And so why not give them what they want: themselves. Their mundane, fragmented and senseless lives. A hamburger.

That said, there is no surrealism or superheroes or vivid illustrations present in Linder’sPinocchio. There is, however, a plunger, a frame, and a mirror. There is an idea, the face of the spectator, and the background consisting of patrons of contemporary art coming and going from an exhibition to the city of San Francisco. And of course, there is Pinocchio, who, through his own delusion, has descended into a disturbingly mediocre and yet palatable version of hell.